New study: San Francisco has second highest inequality in United States

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Map courtesy of Brookings Institution

San Francisco has the second highest gap between the rich and the poor in the United States, according to a new study from the Brookings Institution released today. 
The study looked at US Census data across different income levels and ranked cities for not only the widening chasm between the rich and the poor, but also the speed at which that gap increased. Though San Francisco has the second widest income inequality gap (second to Atlanta, where the poor are poorer, but the rich far less rich than here), it's tops in terms of the speed at which the wealthy are pulling away from the rest of us, the study found.

"Not surprisingly, San Francisco experienced the largest increase in its ratio from 2007 to 2012," the Brookings Institution reported. "Income for its typical 20th-percentile household dropped $4,000 during that period, while income for its typical 95th-percentile household soared by $28,000. No other city saw nearly as large an increase in its rich households’ incomes."

inequalityrowth

San Francisco was second place for highest inequality, but tops in terms of speed at which the income gap widened.

San Francisco differed from other cities in the unique nature of its inequality as well -- for the most part, we're unequal because our rich got richer, while other cities' poor got poorer. "San Francisco’s ratio is high because its wealthy households have very high incomes, considerably higher than in any other major city ($353,000 at the 95th percentile)," Brookings Institution reported. And as anyone who's looked for an apartment in San Francisco has seen, the poor and middle class are also getting pushed out of the city, which the study also noted.

So why is all this such a problem? Can't everyone just move to Oakland? The study also noted the problems inherent in a city with a wide income gap.

"A city where the rich are very rich, and the poor very poor, is likely to face many difficulties," the Brookings Institution noted. "It may struggle to maintain mixed-income school environments that produce better outcomes for low-income kids. It may have too narrow a tax base from which to sustainably raise the revenues necessary for essential city services. And it may fail to produce housing and neighborhoods accessible to middle-class workers and families, so that those who move up or down the income ladder ultimately have no choice but to move out."

These are problems the city knows all too well. As the San Francisco Public Press reported recently, our public school system is increasingly divided between haves and have-nots, and as the Guardian reported only this week, our infrastructure funding is lacking by billions of dollars. And of course, as our families flee the city, San Francisco loses its children in droves, which US Census data has also highlighted. 

Read the full report from on San Francisco's widening income gap here.

 

Comments

If a billionaire moves into your zip code, it immediately becomes much more unequal, but so what? The poor didn't get poorer as a result and, indeed, they may get richer if that billionaire throws his money around.

So SF has high inequality because it is a relatively small city with a dozen or so billionaires. That tells you nothing more than that.

Inequality means that at least some people are succeeding. If everyone were failing, we'd be totally equal but how is that better?

Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 3:17 pm

How can we take from one group and give to another? That is the question we progressives must answer. There must be a more effective way than what we have currently - which is the progressive income tax. Could we just expropriate bank accounts with SF addresses which are above a certain limit? Exercise eminent domain and seize large homes occupied by only one family? Put in roadblocks and force people to give up what's in their wallet or jewelry or sign over their cars?

I'm open to any and all suggestions but clearly we need to be a lot more forceful. The people won't wait forever to take what is rightfully theirs.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 3:51 pm

like the dogs that they are, leave their rotting corpses for the buzzards to gorge on, and seize their assets to give to the most worthless people we can find?

Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 4:13 pm

and classicism, which is rife in Amerikkka. Once they are given their just deserts they will finally be able to exercise their creativity and stretch their wings and fly. The answers to all our problems lie in releasing the creative energies of the oppressed people of this fascist state.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 4:33 pm

They knew the risks when they decided to be born.

Oh, wait

Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 4:47 pm

You mean like what happened in Cuba ? Been there, done that you brain dead moron, no wonder you are a poor, whining, parasite...

Posted by Guest on Feb. 22, 2014 @ 1:41 pm

Childish and unproductive. Try better.

Posted by Cw on Feb. 22, 2014 @ 1:06 pm

Please take the time to read and think about this seriously:

©Tyrone E. Thomas Jr.

Presentation
My name is Tyrone Thomas Jr. I am a visionary and social entrepreneur who would like to significantly help others live a better life and contribute to making the world a better place for our present & future generations. I have come to realize that considering the available technology and vast resources on this planet to eliminate poverty; we are all either part of the problem or part of the solution.
Before I get started I want you to know that I embarked on this journey not as a way to make money, but an attempt to find a way to effectively help a few family members currently relying on Food Stamps and other forms of social services to supply their basic everyday needs. My primary goal was to find a simple way to help them rise sufficiently above the poverty level and get off government assistance without requiring them to do things that they do not have the necessary skill, experience, education, opportunity or financial means to accomplish.
The world’s richest 300 people control more wealth than the poorest 3 billion and the gap continues to grow?
We should all understand that wealth inequality is essential to a functioning society, but a high degree of wealth inequality is the root cause of many serious problems here in America and across the Globe. The more crucial of those problems to the well-being of humanity are poverty and adequate health care. This is why all developed countries have social net programs or systems in place to address these two issues.
It is a well-known fact that…The rich are getting richer and the poor and middle class are declining.

Inequality, Poverty and Health Care are three of America's most persistent and serious problems. The United States produces more per capita than any other industrialized country, but more than $500 billion per year goes to public assistance and social insurance programs. Despite our wealth and efforts to resolve these issues, inequality and poverty are more prevalent in the United States than in most of the rest of the industrialized world. It is also more prevalent now than it was in the early seventies.
To win the war on poverty and reduce inequality, it has become obvious that we cannot depend on government spending, or charity donations to non-profit organizations that provide support services to the nations needy. New tools and innovative ideas in social impact efforts are required for this task.
http://www.mckinsey.com/client_service/social_sector/latest_thinking/fin...
According to the US Census Bureau, here in America there are currently 46.6 million people living in poverty who receive food stamp benefits through an entitlement program called SNAP. This program currently costs taxpayers $74.6 billion per year.
http://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/SNAPsummary.htm
The extreme income and economic inequality that we are currently experiencing is dangerous for everyone, even the rich…because when income inequality gets bad enough, average people don't have much money to pay their bills or buy products and services; And many have no choice but to join the tens of millions already on food stamps and other entitlement programs.
This hurts small businesses, reduces corporate profits, causes or contributes to civil unrest and impedes economic growth which ultimately affects the rich people’s ability to get even richer.
During our recent national and global economic crisis which we are currently trying to overcome, most of the people came to a point of being financially tapped out. Unfortunately rich people and businesses responded by firing more workers, to increase revenue and they also stopped making investments which rely on general public discretionary spending to generate a profit. This simply made the situation worse. The issues of income and economic inequality are now at the forefront of conversations by leaders across the Globe.
As proof of an effort by society to address poverty and income inequality, here in America minimum wage workers at major companies such as McDonald’s, Burger King, Wendy's KFC, Taco Bell and Wal-Mart have been striking for higher pay and seeking to unionize.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=FuCNH7dqZxg
http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/fast-food-strike-workers-walkout-demandi...
On November 1, 2013 there was a cut in food stamp benefits for all recipients under the SNAP program. These cuts will likely cause hardship for some SNAP participants, who will include 22 million children in 2014 (10 million of whom live in “deep poverty,” with family incomes below half of the poverty line) and 9 million people who are elderly or have a serious disability. Cutting these households’ benefits will reduce their ability to purchase food. This cut will be the equivalent of taking away 21 meals per month for a family of four, or 16 meals for a family of three. Essentially what this means is that the poor will become poorer and it will effectively increase poverty and the widening gap of economic inequality in America.
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/?fa=view&id=3899
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/23/food-stamp-cuts-_n_3975228.html

To date there has been no government or private sector solution to a way out of the heavy financial burden on taxpayer funded social net programs or to effectively ensure a transition for financially challenged families from dependency to independence.
It is now a popular opinion in America that one of the best ways to fix the inequality and poverty problems is to tax most of the rich people’s money and give it to the poor.
Another popular way thought to fix these problems is to persuade rich people and businesses that it’s in their best interest to share more of their wealth by paying employees more money through raising the minimum wage. But history shows us that this will not happen voluntarily and when forced to do so, numerous methods to counter the profit losses are put into action. This method also usually causes inflated prices, drives some smaller companies out of business and reduces employees work hours. For most businesses, paying more in wages only works if it is justified by bottom line profits.
Instead of continuing the efforts to force rich people to give up their money through higher taxes, raising the minimum wage, escalating the conflict between Democrats and Republicans on Sequester issues or increasing spending cuts to social net programs to reduce the federal deficit…Let’s do it differently, by creating a system that benefits the government, businesses and everyone in society including the rich, in a way that reduces income and economic inequality while having a positive impact on other problems without the unnecessary begging, sacrifices, politics, new laws that will not work as intended and empty promises.
With that said, I would like to introduce the “United Shared Savings Network” …an idea that disrupts the status quo and transforms our world for the better.
Please take a moment to consider the following:
Rich people make money by investing and reinvesting their money in things that create a profit which provides them with passive income.
Most Middle class people earn a living by working on a professional mid to high level paying job or own a business which provides a similar income. Some of them have enough disposable income to accumulate savings in a financial vehicle which pays interest and/or use it to make investments that create a profit. The outcome of both methods is passive income.
What both of these groups have in common is the financial capability to create a passive income. For the middle class this is a stairway to becoming wealthy or rich and immune to poverty due to unemployment, a declining economy, a lack of education or an unfortunate life event.
In stark contrast, poor people do not have the luxury of disposable income which could provide an economic opportunity to accumulate savings or make a sufficient capital investment in anything which could produce a profit or passive income. For them it is usually a daily, weekly or monthly struggle trying to keep food on the table and a roof over their head. Most of them rely on one or more social service or entitlement programs to accomplish this goal. This means they do not make enough money to supply their basic everyday needs.
The purchase or sale transaction of a product or service whether it’s tangible or intangible, is how people and businesses make money.
All people participate in these product and service transactions, but unfortunately 80% of the people do not benefit from this activity above the level of wage earner. Here in America the end result is 20% of the people possess over 90% of all financial assets and respectively the top 1% has 43%.
After analyzing these two important realities with keen focus on the bigger picture, we determined that the best common sense way to reduce poverty along with extreme income and economic inequality is to provide an opportunity where all people including the very poor, elderly, unemployed, handicapped and disabled could participate in earning income from their current and future purchasing activity. This will literally level the income opportunity playing field for everyone, while greatly enhancing the efforts to create jobs and provide more training and education opportunities for those in need. By no means will the United Shared Savings Network attempt to make poor people become wealthy or rich , but only to bring them to a point of existence sufficiently above the poverty level and provide an opportunity for further advancement in society without resorting to crime or relying on public assistance.
The basic idea of the United Shared Savings Network concept is to redirect a small percentage of purchasing activity profits back into the pockets of the purchasing consumers for them to spend again. It’s sort of a self-perpetuating stimulus package that funds itself from something that everyone is already doing which makes corporations and rich people prosper. There are several ways we could achieve this within the framework of United Shared Savings Network, but we leave that issue for a future conversation.
Through the United Shared Savings Network, this wonderful concept will produce the following results:
(A) Eliminate poverty in households of the lower income.
(B) Cover the cost of Health Care Insurance Premiums for the uninsured.
(C) Allow large and small businesses to participate in significantly giving back to society while dramatically changing lives of the customers who shop with them and keep their doors open.
(D) Provide lower income households with sufficient capital to get in the game of investing, business ownership, home ownership and much more.
(E) Allows more lower and middle class people the financial ability to pay off educational expenses and consumer debts.
(F) Justify voluntary wage increases due to increased profits for businesses.
(G) Create new jobs due to a higher demand for better products and services and healthier foods.
(H) Accelerate Economic Recovery
(I) Encourages new investments in Housing, Manufacturing and other things that have a positive impact on overall Economic Growth.
And the list goes on……..
The United Shared Savings Network program will bring about a full circle effect of profit redistribution that will reduce poverty and reduce inequality without having a negative impact on anyone or anything in society. We simply tweak what already exists by maximizing the benefits of cash back, rebate, reward and electronic coupon programs already offered by current businesses.

How It Works
1. Our members join a number of participating Cash Back, Rewards, Loyalty, Rebate, Discount Club or Coupon Savings Programs available in the market that offers the cash back option a check or electronic payment into an account of their choice.

2. Our members designate the “United Shared Savings Network” as payee for the cash out option, which authorizes an automatic transfer of their cash back into the United Shared Savings Network group account.

3. At the end of every month “United Shared Savings Network” re-distributes the accumulated group savings back to all members on a structure that allows each member to ultimately receive a payout of up to $2,500 per month as new members join the program.

Our uniquely designed program is the only concept that will easily work in concert with existing economic systems, does not cause inflation, does not hurt retail businesses and does not punish the rich or diminish the idea of capitalism.
In order for this program to work properly for everyone in society, the lower income people must be plugged in first. We suggest starting with every one currently receiving food stamp benefits which is a logical choice to have the greatest social impact to help the neediest people in the least amount of time.
Also, unlike many existing programs, every household will qualify and everyone is welcome, because many families are at the poverty line who do not qualify for benefits or would receive so very little assistance that it does not make sense to apply. There are also those millions of people and families who are too proud to accept government assistance as a matter of principal and would rather do without it.
The “United Shared Savings Network” business model will:
(A) Reduce income and economic inequality in a way that benefits everyone in society.
(B) Help solve many existing problems from reducing the Federal Deficit to eliminating Poverty.
(C) Create economic growth; and
(D) Result in a more stable, peaceful and progressive economy for the good of society as a whole.

Please feel free to contact me with any comments, questions or for more information.

By: Tyrone E. Thomas Jr.
Mobile: (229) 305-2501
Fax: (888) 502-1379
Email: tythomasjr08@gmail.com

Posted by Guest Tyrone Thomas Jr. on Jun. 30, 2014 @ 12:55 pm

Please take the time to read and think about this seriously:

©Tyrone E. Thomas Jr.

Presentation
My name is Tyrone Thomas Jr. I am a visionary and social entrepreneur who would like to significantly help others live a better life and contribute to making the world a better place for our present & future generations. I have come to realize that considering the available technology and vast resources on this planet to eliminate poverty; we are all either part of the problem or part of the solution.
Before I get started I want you to know that I embarked on this journey not as a way to make money, but an attempt to find a way to effectively help a few family members currently relying on Food Stamps and other forms of social services to supply their basic everyday needs. My primary goal was to find a simple way to help them rise sufficiently above the poverty level and get off government assistance without requiring them to do things that they do not have the necessary skill, experience, education, opportunity or financial means to accomplish.
The world’s richest 300 people control more wealth than the poorest 3 billion and the gap continues to grow?
We should all understand that wealth inequality is essential to a functioning society, but a high degree of wealth inequality is the root cause of many serious problems here in America and across the Globe. The more crucial of those problems to the well-being of humanity are poverty and adequate health care. This is why all developed countries have social net programs or systems in place to address these two issues.
It is a well-known fact that…The rich are getting richer and the poor and middle class are declining.

Inequality, Poverty and Health Care are three of America's most persistent and serious problems. The United States produces more per capita than any other industrialized country, but more than $500 billion per year goes to public assistance and social insurance programs. Despite our wealth and efforts to resolve these issues, inequality and poverty are more prevalent in the United States than in most of the rest of the industrialized world. It is also more prevalent now than it was in the early seventies.
To win the war on poverty and reduce inequality, it has become obvious that we cannot depend on government spending, or charity donations to non-profit organizations that provide support services to the nations needy. New tools and innovative ideas in social impact efforts are required for this task.
http://www.mckinsey.com/client_service/social_sector/latest_thinking/fin...
According to the US Census Bureau, here in America there are currently 46.6 million people living in poverty who receive food stamp benefits through an entitlement program called SNAP. This program currently costs taxpayers $74.6 billion per year.
http://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/SNAPsummary.htm
The extreme income and economic inequality that we are currently experiencing is dangerous for everyone, even the rich…because when income inequality gets bad enough, average people don't have much money to pay their bills or buy products and services; And many have no choice but to join the tens of millions already on food stamps and other entitlement programs.
This hurts small businesses, reduces corporate profits, causes or contributes to civil unrest and impedes economic growth which ultimately affects the rich people’s ability to get even richer.
During our recent national and global economic crisis which we are currently trying to overcome, most of the people came to a point of being financially tapped out. Unfortunately rich people and businesses responded by firing more workers, to increase revenue and they also stopped making investments which rely on general public discretionary spending to generate a profit. This simply made the situation worse. The issues of income and economic inequality are now at the forefront of conversations by leaders across the Globe.
As proof of an effort by society to address poverty and income inequality, here in America minimum wage workers at major companies such as McDonald’s, Burger King, Wendy's KFC, Taco Bell and Wal-Mart have been striking for higher pay and seeking to unionize.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=FuCNH7dqZxg
http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/fast-food-strike-workers-walkout-demandi...
On November 1, 2013 there was a cut in food stamp benefits for all recipients under the SNAP program. These cuts will likely cause hardship for some SNAP participants, who will include 22 million children in 2014 (10 million of whom live in “deep poverty,” with family incomes below half of the poverty line) and 9 million people who are elderly or have a serious disability. Cutting these households’ benefits will reduce their ability to purchase food. This cut will be the equivalent of taking away 21 meals per month for a family of four, or 16 meals for a family of three. Essentially what this means is that the poor will become poorer and it will effectively increase poverty and the widening gap of economic inequality in America.
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/?fa=view&id=3899
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/23/food-stamp-cuts-_n_3975228.html

To date there has been no government or private sector solution to a way out of the heavy financial burden on taxpayer funded social net programs or to effectively ensure a transition for financially challenged families from dependency to independence.
It is now a popular opinion in America that one of the best ways to fix the inequality and poverty problems is to tax most of the rich people’s money and give it to the poor.
Another popular way thought to fix these problems is to persuade rich people and businesses that it’s in their best interest to share more of their wealth by paying employees more money through raising the minimum wage. But history shows us that this will not happen voluntarily and when forced to do so, numerous methods to counter the profit losses are put into action. This method also usually causes inflated prices, drives some smaller companies out of business and reduces employees work hours. For most businesses, paying more in wages only works if it is justified by bottom line profits.
Instead of continuing the efforts to force rich people to give up their money through higher taxes, raising the minimum wage, escalating the conflict between Democrats and Republicans on Sequester issues or increasing spending cuts to social net programs to reduce the federal deficit…Let’s do it differently, by creating a system that benefits the government, businesses and everyone in society including the rich, in a way that reduces income and economic inequality while having a positive impact on other problems without the unnecessary begging, sacrifices, politics, new laws that will not work as intended and empty promises.
With that said, I would like to introduce the “United Shared Savings Network” …an idea that disrupts the status quo and transforms our world for the better.
Please take a moment to consider the following:
Rich people make money by investing and reinvesting their money in things that create a profit which provides them with passive income.
Most Middle class people earn a living by working on a professional mid to high level paying job or own a business which provides a similar income. Some of them have enough disposable income to accumulate savings in a financial vehicle which pays interest and/or use it to make investments that create a profit. The outcome of both methods is passive income.
What both of these groups have in common is the financial capability to create a passive income. For the middle class this is a stairway to becoming wealthy or rich and immune to poverty due to unemployment, a declining economy, a lack of education or an unfortunate life event.
In stark contrast, poor people do not have the luxury of disposable income which could provide an economic opportunity to accumulate savings or make a sufficient capital investment in anything which could produce a profit or passive income. For them it is usually a daily, weekly or monthly struggle trying to keep food on the table and a roof over their head. Most of them rely on one or more social service or entitlement programs to accomplish this goal. This means they do not make enough money to supply their basic everyday needs.
The purchase or sale transaction of a product or service whether it’s tangible or intangible, is how people and businesses make money.
All people participate in these product and service transactions, but unfortunately 80% of the people do not benefit from this activity above the level of wage earner. Here in America the end result is 20% of the people possess over 90% of all financial assets and respectively the top 1% has 43%.
After analyzing these two important realities with keen focus on the bigger picture, we determined that the best common sense way to reduce poverty along with extreme income and economic inequality is to provide an opportunity where all people including the very poor, elderly, unemployed, handicapped and disabled could participate in earning income from their current and future purchasing activity. This will literally level the income opportunity playing field for everyone, while greatly enhancing the efforts to create jobs and provide more training and education opportunities for those in need. By no means will the United Shared Savings Network attempt to make poor people become wealthy or rich , but only to bring them to a point of existence sufficiently above the poverty level and provide an opportunity for further advancement in society without resorting to crime or relying on public assistance.
The basic idea of the United Shared Savings Network concept is to redirect a small percentage of purchasing activity profits back into the pockets of the purchasing consumers for them to spend again. It’s sort of a self-perpetuating stimulus package that funds itself from something that everyone is already doing which makes corporations and rich people prosper. There are several ways we could achieve this within the framework of United Shared Savings Network, but we leave that issue for a future conversation.
Through the United Shared Savings Network, this wonderful concept will produce the following results:
(A) Eliminate poverty in households of the lower income.
(B) Cover the cost of Health Care Insurance Premiums for the uninsured.
(C) Allow large and small businesses to participate in significantly giving back to society while dramatically changing lives of the customers who shop with them and keep their doors open.
(D) Provide lower income households with sufficient capital to get in the game of investing, business ownership, home ownership and much more.
(E) Allows more lower and middle class people the financial ability to pay off educational expenses and consumer debts.
(F) Justify voluntary wage increases due to increased profits for businesses.
(G) Create new jobs due to a higher demand for better products and services and healthier foods.
(H) Accelerate Economic Recovery
(I) Encourages new investments in Housing, Manufacturing and other things that have a positive impact on overall Economic Growth.
And the list goes on……..
The United Shared Savings Network program will bring about a full circle effect of profit redistribution that will reduce poverty and reduce inequality without having a negative impact on anyone or anything in society. We simply tweak what already exists by maximizing the benefits of cash back, rebate, reward and electronic coupon programs already offered by current businesses.

How It Works
1. Our members join a number of participating Cash Back, Rewards, Loyalty, Rebate, Discount Club or Coupon Savings Programs available in the market that offers the cash back option a check or electronic payment into an account of their choice.

2. Our members designate the “United Shared Savings Network” as payee for the cash out option, which authorizes an automatic transfer of their cash back into the United Shared Savings Network group account.

3. At the end of every month “United Shared Savings Network” re-distributes the accumulated group savings back to all members on a structure that allows each member to ultimately receive a payout of up to $2,500 per month as new members join the program.

Our uniquely designed program is the only concept that will easily work in concert with existing economic systems, does not cause inflation, does not hurt retail businesses and does not punish the rich or diminish the idea of capitalism.
In order for this program to work properly for everyone in society, the lower income people must be plugged in first. We suggest starting with every one currently receiving food stamp benefits which is a logical choice to have the greatest social impact to help the neediest people in the least amount of time.
Also, unlike many existing programs, every household will qualify and everyone is welcome, because many families are at the poverty line who do not qualify for benefits or would receive so very little assistance that it does not make sense to apply. There are also those millions of people and families who are too proud to accept government assistance as a matter of principal and would rather do without it.
The “United Shared Savings Network” business model will:
(A) Reduce income and economic inequality in a way that benefits everyone in society.
(B) Help solve many existing problems from reducing the Federal Deficit to eliminating Poverty.
(C) Create economic growth; and
(D) Result in a more stable, peaceful and progressive economy for the good of society as a whole.

Please feel free to contact me with any comments, questions or for more information.

By: Tyrone E. Thomas Jr.
Mobile: (229) 305-2501
Fax: (888) 502-1379
Email: tythomasjr08@gmail.com

Posted by Guest Tyrone Thomas Jr. on Jun. 30, 2014 @ 12:55 pm

Logic doesn't work with so much with "progressives."

Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 9:34 pm
Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 3:21 pm

policies on busing - nope, nothing to see here. Move along now.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 3:31 pm

Anyone with kids knows that

Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 3:43 pm

I said - nothing to see here. Move on. Everyone knows it's rising housing prices and income inequality. EVERYONE KNOWS THAT.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 3:52 pm

families out of SF. Two kids at private school can run you 40-50 K a year. Better to move to Marin and get the same quality for free at public neightborhood schools.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 4:14 pm

If you actually had kids or knew anything about San Francisco you would know that. SFUSD massively cut the budget for bussing. Keep up with your tired old reactionary BS though, it obviously makes you feel better about yourself.

Posted by GlenParkDaddy on Feb. 23, 2014 @ 11:58 pm

far away from their homes. It doesn't literally mean they are transported by a yellow school bus, although they might be.

It's a policy of forcing kids from good areas to attend bad schools against their parents' wishes.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 24, 2014 @ 8:45 am

It is really tragic when a wealthy child has to rub shoulders with a middle class child. Tragic, I tell you.

Posted by GlenParkDaddy on Feb. 24, 2014 @ 1:37 pm

is not a trivial thing for force tens of thousands of kids to attend school far from where they live.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 24, 2014 @ 2:32 pm

One of the main factors when a family buys a home are the schools located in the district. People want good schools that are nearby their homes. They don't want to have to drive their kids all the way across the city to satisfy some idiot's idea of "diversity". If you owned a home in the outer Richmond (which is by no means wealthy), would you want to drive your kid (or have him ride the bus) into the Bayview? Or would you want him to go to Argonne, Roosevelt, and then Washington?

Posted by Guest on Feb. 24, 2014 @ 6:28 pm

If you lived in the Outer Richmond and wanted to go to a school in the Outer Richmond, you would have no problem getting into one.

Unlike you, I am a parent with children in public school here.

Are you seriously trying to claim that home prices are being depressed by the fact that the SFUSD is not good enough? How much higher do you want them to be?

Posted by GlenParkDaddy on Feb. 26, 2014 @ 7:56 am
Posted by Guest on Feb. 26, 2014 @ 8:16 am

Really depressing.

But a gratuitous link to SPUR? Was that really necessary to make your point?

Posted by Greg on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 3:46 pm

Would you be happier if nobody was a billionaire?

The SPUR piece was quite reasonable, I thought. Oakland looks attractive on a ppsf basis.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 4:23 pm

as has been explained multiple times.

Posted by Greg on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 11:24 pm

Again, a billionaire moves into your zip code. It's now more unequal. How have you been harmed?

Posted by Guest on Feb. 21, 2014 @ 8:29 am

Envy makes you sick.....

Posted by Guest on Feb. 22, 2014 @ 1:43 pm

Justice is the cure.....

Posted by Guest on Feb. 22, 2014 @ 2:23 pm

subjective concept when used the way you mean.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 22, 2014 @ 3:09 pm

Envy is very subjective. You often ascribe envy to me and others, when in fact envy is the last thing I feel. It's not even debatable; it's just plain wrong. I know it's wrong because I know what my own emotions are, and it's not envy I feel.

Justice, on the other hand, is an easy concept to grasp. Even children can agree on basic fairness.

Posted by Greg on Feb. 22, 2014 @ 11:12 pm

imply that your envy doesn't exist - only that you shut out all realization of it.

Your ideology that seeks to punish the successful is essentially emotional. You probably think of it as some kind of drive for "justice" but the reality is that you just cannot stand the fact that some people have billions, even when they do immense good with that money, like Gates and buffett.

ENVY.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 24, 2014 @ 8:47 am

We need more taxes on the rich. That is the most important thing that must be done. If they decide that they don't want to live here, good riddance.

They need to pay their fair share. They benefit the most from police, fire, Muni and all the other things that allow them to prosper so much, it is time to ask them to pay more.
They obviously can afford it.

We can use the money to fix the crumbling public infrastructure, improve our public schools and help Muni.

Posted by GlenParkDaddy on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 4:32 pm
Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 4:34 pm
Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 4:45 pm

How do rich people benefit the most from MUNI and the fire department? Rich people don't ride MUNI. And does making more money mean you're more likely to have fires in your home? I guess as you get richer the chances of a bananas foster accident rises exponentially so there's that.

And if the rich leave, they take their tax dollars with them. Which means less money for services. Which means quality of life goes down. Who do you think pays for all the services in this city? It sure as hell isn't the illegal immigrant family living in a tenement.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 20, 2014 @ 7:29 pm

the city, it's "services", it's workers, it's unions and it's self-righteousness.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 21, 2014 @ 8:30 am

If your life is so great, why do you feel the need to troll message boards for a city you no longer even live in?

Posted by GlenParkDaddy on Feb. 24, 2014 @ 12:02 am

There are ways to live in the city and not have to deal with the city.

But I'm not giving away all of my secrets

Posted by Guest on Feb. 24, 2014 @ 8:43 am

GPD -

You still didn't explain your statement how the rich benefit the most from police, fire, and MUNI. Police maybe I can understand. But how the hell do the rich benefit from SFFD and MUNI any more than anyone other person on the street???

And your suggestion to kick out the rich people? How the hell do you think city services are paid for? That illegal immigrant family living in a slum doesn't bring in nearly the same revenue as a $100K-a-year tech worker. You might think they make for a more vibrant community, but "vibrancy" doesn't pave roads, hire more buses, or hire cops.

You know what happens to cities when money leaves? Detroit. Need a closer example? Vallejo and Stockton. Hell, take a look at Oakland. They're trying their damndest to bring in more money to help fund a police department that is half of what it should be. They also have a crime rate that is among the highest in the nation.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 24, 2014 @ 6:46 pm

wants to blame someone else for his failure.

Posted by anon on Feb. 24, 2014 @ 7:09 pm

I already said how the rich benefit: their employees are taken to work by Muni, they have more property that needs protection from fire and police and they benefit most from the current status quo. The wealthy have the most interest in a stable and productive society because they benefit the most from it. And take the most from it, I might add.

If you are seriously concerned that San Francisco is headed for Detroit, Stockton, Vallejo or Oakland status, then are more in need of help than I had ever imagined.

I have never suggested kicking out the rich people, just that they should pay their fair share. I am the one who wants to build more housing remember, so that more people of all income levels can live here. I like Tech Workers and I am not a Progressive. So take your rant elsewhere.

Posted by GlenParkDaddy on Mar. 18, 2014 @ 6:54 am

Income is irrelevant to local tax take.

Posted by marcos on Mar. 18, 2014 @ 7:16 am

The payroll tax is based on income.

And income drives the ability to spend, leading to sales tax and property tax revenues, as well as drive ( a whole host of fees and fines).

Posted by Guest on Mar. 18, 2014 @ 7:30 am

The payroll tax is being replaced with the gross receipts tax, it is not long for this world.

Posted by marcos on Mar. 18, 2014 @ 7:54 am

between income level and tax paid is not very credible.

And SF is the only city that tries to apply payroll tax to stock options, which is borderline bizarre.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 18, 2014 @ 8:09 am

We gave you a chance to conquer your idiocy but clearly your idiocy has won.

Posted by marcos on Mar. 18, 2014 @ 8:25 am

lapses into opacity and obfuscation.

Good luck with your theory that the wealthy pay less taxes than the poor.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 18, 2014 @ 8:46 am

If that success generated more wealth, than everyone is better off, even if some are more better off than others.

Focus on wealth generation, not wealth distribution.

Posted by Guest on Feb. 23, 2014 @ 11:07 am

The most successful societies tend to be the most equal, not the most unequal. See the map I posted.

Posted by Greg on Feb. 23, 2014 @ 11:20 am

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